Gender Equality in the Visual Arts: Screening & Panel Discussion

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Gallery 400 at the University of Illinois - Chicago

400 S. Peoria St.

Chicago, IL

Reception at 5:30 pm

Screening begins at 6:00 pm, Panel discussion at 8:00 pm

Moderated by Judith Russi Kirshner. Panelists: Claudine Ise, Barbara Rossi, and Sue Williams

FREE

***Seating is first come, first served. Guests who have already seen the film at a previous screening and would like to attend the panel discussion only will be admitted at 8 pm if seats remain.***

Please join Pentimenti Productions, Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, and Gallery 400 at the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts at the University of Illinois at Chicago for a special screening of Hairy Who & The Chicago Imagists and panel discussion.

This event will be the third in a series of three free screening and discussion events funded by a Chicago Public Programs Grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art. Each discussion expands upon a different theme presented in the film. The first of these was at the Logan Center at the University of Chicago on November 7th, 2014 (details here), the second at the Chicago Cultural Center on February 7th, 2015 (details here).

The general focus of the discussion at this third event will be gender equality in the visual arts. Many of the Imagist artists were and are vocal advocates of the equal treatment that they felt male and female artists in their group enjoyed as early as the mid-1960s. Many of the artists and their colleagues describe this feature of the Imagist scene as one that set it distinctly apart from concurrent male-dominated scenes in New York and Los Angeles. This subject is touched upon in Hairy Who & The Chicago Imagists, and this panel discussion will be an opportunity for Imagist and contemporary artists to come together to explore this history and its legacy more fully and critically.

Update: Watch video of this panel discussion below!



Discussion Participants

Moderator:

Judith Russi Kirshner has been Deputy Director for Education and Woman’s Board Endowed Chair at the Art Institute of Chicago since March of 2013. Previously, Kirshner held the position of Dean of the College of Architecture and the Arts at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she also served as Director of the School of Art and Design.  Kirshner has also served as Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago from 1976 to 1980, at The Terra Museum of American Art from 1985 to 1987 and in the Art History Department of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Critic and curator, Kirshner lectures frequently on contemporary art and is a member of the Cultural Affairs Advisory Board of the City of Chicago as well as an advisory board member of numerous national and Chicago cultural organizations.  She has served on multiple panels for the National Endowment for the Arts and Illinois Arts Council.  At the Museum of Contemporary Art in 1978, Kirshner curated Gordon Matta-Clarke’s last public project, Circus on the Caribbean Orange. Recent lectures include Arte Povera Portraits at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles,The Art of Criticism, Carla Lonzi at The Tate Museum in London and at the Walker Art Museum in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Gordon Matta Clark at the Royal Academy of Denmark and Drawings from the Richard and Mary Gray Collection at the Art Institute of Chicago (2010). Winner of an Andy Warhol/Creative Capital award for critical writing, her recent publications include an essay in Wack! Art in the Feminist Revolution, 2007, on the Italians Gina Pane, Carla Lonzi, Lea Vergine and Anne Marie Sauzeau Boetti and a chapter in Carol Rama (Skira, 2004). A long time contributor to Artforum and other journals, Kirshner has also published and lectured on the work of Judy Ledgerwood, Christina Ramberg,Tom Otterness, Dan Peterman, Gordon Matta-Clark, Roni Horn and Karen Reimer.

Panelists:

Claudine Isé is the Executive Director of Woman Made Gallery, a feminist contemporary art space in Chicago, and is a visiting clinical assistant professor in the Museum and Exhibition Studies Program in the School of Art and Art History at the University of Illinois, Chicago. She has nearly 20 years' experience working in the field of contemporary art as a writer, editor, educator, and curator, having worked in Chicago as a freelance contributor to publications such as the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Magazine, Artforum.com, Art Ltd. and Bad at Sports, and serving as Blog Editor of Art21, a renowned nonprofit organization that uses digital media platforms to educate the public worldwide about contemporary art and artists. Before moving to Chicago in 2008, Isé was associate curator of exhibitions at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, where she organized a number of solo and thematic group exhibitions. Prior to that, she was an assistant curator at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, where she curated a number of Hammer Projects shows highlighting the work of emerging artists. She received a Ph.D. in Film, Literature and Culture from USC's School of Cinema-Television and has a B.A. in English Literature from Pomona College.

Barbara Rossi received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1970, and has taught painting and drawing at the School since 1971. In 1970 and 1971 she showed in the "Marriage Chicago Style" and "Chicago Antigua" group exhibitions at the Hyde Park Art Center with several of the other artists who would become known as the Chicago Imagists. Over the course of the ensuing years, she exhibited in many of the Chicago Imagist group shows around the world, including the Bienale de Sao Paulo that traveled around South and Central America from 1973 to 1974 and "Who Chicago?," which traveled around the United Kingdom in 1980 and 1981. Rossi has exhibited her work in group shows around the country, including at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York (in a show of American drawings in 1973 and in the 1975 Biennial), the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art in Wisconsin, the Terra Museum of American Art in Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She was the subject of a solo exhibition at the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago in 1991. Her work is in the collections of institutions around the world, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the Museum des 20 Jahrhunderts Vienna. Since the late 1970s Rossi has studied Indian painting, and as a consequence of her travels in India during the 1980s, she curated an exhibition circulated in the US in 1994-95 and wrote the catalog, From the Ocean of Painting: India's Popular Paintings, 1589 to the Present (Oxford University Press, 1998).

Sue Williams was born in 1954 in Chicago. She came to prominence in the early 1980s, with works that echoed and argued with the dominant postmodern feminist aesthetic of the time. In the years since, her focus has never waned yet her aesthetic interests have moved toward abstraction along with her subject matter and memories. She has had solo shows at the Vienna Secession, Geneva Center for Contemporary Art, and Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden, Germany, along with being included in 3 consecutive Whitney Biennials. She lives and works in New York.

More information: http://gallery400.uic.edu/events/hairy-who-the-chicago-imagists

This program is made possible through support from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

 

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